Five Points – 26/7

I’m continuing with this series. It’s of great use to me as an outlet. I hope you find it useful too. This week I’ve consolidated two points into one.

1. Quote of the week

Experience is the comb that nature gives us after we are bald. — Belgian proverb

2. What I’m reading

I finished The Road to Wigan Pier by Orwell and I highly recommend it. He presents a good case for socialism. He put himself in the position of a coal miner in the last 30s. They worked in pretty shocking conditions. When they got home, they lived in pretty shocking conditions too.

I’ve parked a couple of books I was reading in favour of others. I keep doing this and it isn’t great because it increases the dimension of the work in progress. Still, I am currently reading Gil Amelio’s Profit from Experience. The book was written whilst Gil was at National Semiconductor and is a management book. It is written in a different tone to his book on Apple. Although I’m enjoying the book and finding it useful, the co-author has put Gil on quite a high pedestal.

3. What I’m doing in my free time/ENJOYING

This week these sections are combined. I cannot stress enough how great it is to be back in the cycling saddle. In June and July, I’ve just got on my bike and achieved some distances. This week I completed 75km in a fasted state. In order to keep me on track with cycling, I’ve booked a trip in September to cycle to Europe. Unfortunately, my injury means I won’t be able to do it. Boo.

4. What I’m learning more about

I discovered a rather lovely write up of Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem. Various things come out of this work. If a set of mathematical axioms is consistent, it must be incomplete. For the laymen, this means that it is impossible to produce a solid mathematical theory of “everything”. The article gives the high-level detail of the proof and is accessible with a basic knowledge of mathematics. Gödel‘s story ends unpleasantly – he suffered from mental instability, suffered from a fear of being poisoned and would only eat food prepared by his wife. When his wife, was hospitalised for a significant period of time, he starved to death.

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